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Thursday, August 26, 2010

GAO: Wireless Prices Plummeting; Public Knowledge: We Must Regulate!

So, the GAO recently released a report on the wireless industry and found that:

The biggest changes in the wireless industry since 2000 have been consolidation among wireless carriers and increased use of wireless services by consumers. Industry consolidation has made it more difficult for small and regional carriers to be competitive. Difficulties for these carriers include securing subscribers, making network investments, and offering the latest wireless phones necessary to compete in this dynamic industry. Nevertheless, consumers have also seen benefits, such as generally lower prices, which are approximately 50 percent less than 1999 prices, and better coverage.

Now, if you are a self-described "consumer advocate," I would hope the bottom line here is pretty straightforward and refreshing: Prices fell by 50% in 10 years. That alone is an amazing success story. But that's not the end of the story. The more important fact is that prices fell by that much while innovation in this sector was also flourishing. Do you remember the phone you carried in your pocket -- if you could fit it in your pocket at all -- ten years ago? It was a pretty rudimentary device. It made calls and... well... it made calls. Now, think about the mini-computer that sits in your pocket right now. Stunning little piece of kit. It can text. It can do email. It can get Internet access. You can Twitter on it. Oh, and you can still make calls on it (but who wants to do that anymore!)

The point is, this is a great American capitalist success story that everyone -- especially "consumer advocates" -- should be celebrating. So, what does Public Knowledge president Gigi Sohn have to say?

"These trends do not bode well for consumers, despite any benefits of the moment," she told Ars Technica.

Wait, what?

Continue reading GAO: Wireless Prices Plummeting; Public Knowledge: We Must Regulate! . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 8:05 PM | Economics, Innovation, Spectrum, Wireless

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Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Camel Puts Nose under Tent with FCC "Wireless Model" for Internet Regulation

Julius Genachowski claims his "Third Way" approach to taking over the Internet looks a lot like the benign "wireless model" of regulation.

If it were true, that would be a good thing.

According to Genachowski:

In its approach to wireless communications, Congress mandated that the FCC subject wireless communications to the same Title II provisions generally applicable to telecommunications services while also directing that the FCC consider forbearing from the application of many of these provisions to the wireless marketplace. The Commission did significantly forbear, and the telecommunications industry has repeatedly and resoundingly lauded this approach as well-suited to an emerging technology and welcoming to investment and innovation. In short, the proposed approach is already tried and true.
Presumably, the "wireless model," if applied to the Internet, would spur growth and innovation. But I have a question. In the FCC's NOI, how does the wireless model of "light regulation" apply to, er, the wireless model?

I haven't quite figured out the circularity of that one yet.

Oh, well. Maybe I shouldn't waste my time trying. It seems more apparent than ever that for wireless and wireline broadband service it's not really about regulating "downward" - i.e., deregulating, as is the hallmark of the "wireless model" - but instead, regulating "upward," thus adding regulation.

Continue reading Camel Puts Nose under Tent with FCC "Wireless Model" for Internet Regulation . . .

posted by Mike Wendy @ 3:08 PM | Broadband, Capitol Hill, Communications, Innovation, Internet, Net Neutrality, Regulation, Spectrum, The FCC, Wireless, Wireline

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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Abolishing the FCC and Other Fun Thoughts

Just the other day, leaders from the House and Senate said they planned on updating the Communications Act. Maybe they've finally started listening to us - we proposed doing this back in 2005, with PFF's Digital Age Communications Act (DACA). Or, perhaps the FCC's so-called "Third Way" doesn't look like the "no-brainer" that the agency spun in its press releases. Well, whatever their intentions may be, it certainly couldn't arrive at a better time.

The framing is all important, of course. Art Brodsky of Public Knowledge (ostensibly one of the groups "writing" the next Act) says Americans shouldn't worry about the FCC's "Third Way." In his view - "The government is not taking over the Internet. What the government is doing is engaging in traditional consumer protection, traditional regulation of a telecommunications service that will get people to the Internet." PK seems happy with this model - whether done at the FCC, or at Congress' hands.

Hmmm...Getting people to the Internet? Traditional, simple stuff. Sort of like strolling to the store, or peddling to the park. Or, like in childhood, making a call from tin cans and string - which is what'll result if PK and their ilk have their way.

Continue reading Abolishing the FCC and Other Fun Thoughts . . .

posted by Mike Wendy @ 2:11 PM | Antitrust & Competition Policy, Broadband, Cable, Communications, DACA, Innovation, Internet, Local Franchising, Mass Media, Media Regulation, Net Neutrality, PFF, Regulation, Spectrum, State Policy, The FCC, The FTC, Universal Service, Wireless

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Thursday, May 20, 2010

FCC Wireless Report Punts - Effective Competition Actually Prevails

As I peruse the FCC's just released Wireless Report, I wanted to jot down some initial thoughts before wading knee-deep in the regulatory morass.

First off - far from press reports which state the FCC clearly determined the market is not "effectively competitive," well, that's wrong. In fact, the FCC fails to make any such determination whatsoever. It says:

...[R]ather than reaching an overarching, industry-wide determination with respect to whether there is "effective competition," the Report complies with the statutory requirement by providing a detailed analysis of the state of competition that seeks to identify areas where market conditions appear to be producing substantial consumer benefits and provides data that can form the basis for inquiries into whether policy levers could produce superior outcomes...

Continue reading FCC Wireless Report Punts - Effective Competition Actually Prevails . . .

posted by Mike Wendy @ 10:25 PM | Antitrust & Competition Policy, Broadband, Communications, Innovation, Internet, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, The FCC, Wireless

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Tuesday, January 26, 2010

What is All This Nonsense about Smartphone Early Termination Fees?

OK, time for a quick rant. What is all this confusion and consternation over early termination fees (ETFs) for high-end smartphones? I mean, seriously, how hard is this process to understand? The FCC has worked itself into a lather over this and is bombarding wireless operators and Google with hate mail letters of inquiry harassing asking them about their ETF policies. I just don't get it. Let's review some simple realities:


  • Smartphones -- especially high-end devices like the iPhone, the Droid, and the Nexus One -- are basically mobile mini computers.

  • Mini mobile computers do not grow on trees; someone has to make them and sell them at a profit or else no one would offer them to begin with.

  • But the people who make and sell these devices (and wireless service for these devices) want to ensure rapid, widespread distribution to win over customers and recoup their costs.

  • So, they offer a classic business inducement -- an upfront subsidy for the product in exchange for monthly payments to amortize the upfront "loan" they have given the customer;

  • AND THEN THEY FORM A CONTRACT WITH THE BUYER TO MAKE THE DEAL WORK. And that contract obligates both sides to live up to their end of the deal.

  • Hey... did I mention they need to form a contract to make the deal worth it? OK, good, wanted to make sure I got that point across.

  • Then they give you a nice shiny new mobile mini-computer that for some reason we Americans still insist on calling a cell phone.

  • Then you start paying off the "loan" they've given you for that device over the span of the service contract. This is called "prorating."

  • But, if you default on that loan by breaking your contract, you'll be hit with a penalty -- an early termination fee -- since it would leave the carrier without a way to recoup the cost of that shiny new mobile mini-computer that they handed you on the cheap when you just absolutely had to have the hot new toy in town.


Is this process really all that complicated? And why is it so controversial? It certainly shouldn't be. Prorating happens every day in countless ways in a capitalist economy. And yet in the apparent techno-entitlement society we live in these days, some people seem to think there's something scandalous about this process when it happens with our beloved mobile devices. In reality, the smartphone subsidy and prorated contract system is really one of the great pro-consumer accomplishments of our time.

Continue reading What is All This Nonsense about Smartphone Early Termination Fees? . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:20 PM | Economics, Spectrum

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State of the Net: summary of remarks by FCC Commissioners Copps & Baker

FCC Commissioners Michael Copps and Meredith Attwell Baker kicked off the 2010 Congressional Internet Caucus "State of the Net" conference this afternoon with two brief keynote addresses. Below I've summarized the highlights here from my live Tweeting at the event (@AdamThierer):

Commissioner Copps

• "every great challenge this country faces... has a broadband component at its core if it's going to be successfully dealt with"
• Broadband is the great enabler; Private sector will lead, but national objectives and visionary public policy also have to be at core
• "sins of recent public policy past" got in way of us doing things that needed to get done
• Worries about wider new "divides between us"; have opportunity to close them
• Praises Hillary Clinton's Internet freedom speech from last week
• Hard to conceptualize the changes that next 5-10 years hold in light of the developments of past 5-10
• Worried about open Internet; "unreasonable discrimination"... doesn't want to allow "too much latitude" to private operators... says it is threat to "openness" (he never really defines the term, however)
• Passionate views on both sides of Net neutrality debate
• Need big pipes and more spectrum to grow capacity (I certainly agree on that one! But Net neutrality isn't going to help us much in that regard)
• He fears consolidation
• Says minority and women voices are not getting heard online (he says we should measure it by audience measurements & ad $$ but doesn't bothering mentioning how much wider the gap was in the old mass media era when none of those voices could get heard at all)
• How do we assure what we're doing "actually works for democracy" and the "public interest" (but never defines what that means)
• Says media is failing us today; victims are public; investigative journalism is dying (but never discusses how current FCC regulation affects the equation)
• cites Founders (Jefferson, Madison) re importance of media ... and then favorably cites McChesney & Nichols new book (ugh, someone needs to tell Commissioner Copps that McChesney is a neo-Marxist who wants to destroy all private media providers!)

Continue reading State of the Net: summary of remarks by FCC Commissioners Copps & Baker . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 2:52 PM | Broadband, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, The FCC

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Thursday, January 7, 2010

Summary of Tech Policy Summit Panel 2 at CES: The Spectrum Grab & Innovation

As I mentioned, I'm out in Vegas attending the Tech Policy Summit at CES today and tomorrow and trying to blog about some of what's going on. Here's my summary of panel#1 on broadband policy and the pending national broadband plan.

The second panel was entitled "The Spectrum Grab and Innovation" and was moderated by Rob Pegoraro of The Washington Post. The panelists were:


  • Dean Brenner, VP of Government Affairs, Qualcomm

  • Michael Calabrese, VP, Wireless Future Program, New America Foundation

  • David Donovan, President, Association for Maximum Service Television (MSTV)

  • Joan Marsh, VP, Federal Regulatory Affairs, AT&T

  • Craig Moffett, VP and Senior Analyst, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.

  • Janice Obuchowski, Founder and President, Freedom Technologies


I have summarized some of what the panelists had to say down below.

Continue reading Summary of Tech Policy Summit Panel 2 at CES: The Spectrum Grab & Innovation . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 4:54 PM | Spectrum

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Friday, December 11, 2009

Transcript of PFF Event on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation

PFF has just released the transcript of an excellent panel discussion I moderated last week entitled, "Let's Make a Deal: Broadcasters, Mobile Broadband, and a Market in Spectrum." As I've mentioned here before, one of the hottest issues in DC right now is the question of broadcast TV spectrum reallocation. Blair Levin, who serves as the Executive Director of the Omnibus Broadband Initiative at the Federal Communications Commission, recently raised the possibility of reallocating a portion of broadcast television spectrum for alternative purposes, namely, mobile broadband. Such a "cash-for-spectrum" swap would give mobile broadband providers to spectrum they need to roll out next generation wireless broadband networks while making sure broadcaster receive compensation for any spectrum they hand over. The FCC just recently released a public notice on "Data Sought on Users of Spectrum," (NBP Public Notice # 26) that looks into the matter. "This inquiry," the agency says," takes into account the value that the United States puts on free, over-the-air television, while also exploring market-based mechanisms for television broadcasters to contribute to the broadband effort any spectrum in excess of that which they need to meet their public interest obligations and remain financially viable." Meanwhile, the House Energy and Commerce Communications Subcommittee is set to hold a hearing on the issue next Tuesday.

PFF's panel discussion on this issue featured an all-star cast of characters, including opening remarks by Blair Levin, and a terrific discussion ensued. [You can hear the full audio from the event here.] Down below I have highlighted some of the major points each speaker made during the discussion and also embedded the complete transcript in a Scribd reader. Also, just a reminder that my PFF colleague Barbara Esbin and I authored a short paper on this issue recently: "An Offer They Can't Refuse: Spectrum Reallocation That Can Benefit Consumers, Broadcasters & the Mobile Broadband Sector."

Continue reading Transcript of PFF Event on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:10 AM | Mass Media, Media Regulation, Spectrum, The FCC

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Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Jenkins on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation Battle

Wall Street Journal columnist Holman Jenkins has a new column up this morning about the ongoing battle over broadcast television spectrum reallocation. ["The Rabbit-Ear Wars."] It discusses the plan being floated by FCC "broadband czar" Blair Levin, who serves as the Executive Director of the Omnibus Broadband Initiative at the Federal Communications Commission. Levin has raised the possibility of reallocating a portion of broadcast television spectrum for alternative purposes, namely, mobile broadband. Such a "cash-for-spectrum" swap would give mobile broadband providers to spectrum they need to roll out next generation wireless broadband networks while making sure broadcaster receive compensation for any spectrum they hand over. The FCC just recently released a public notice on "Data Sought on Users of Spectrum," (NBP Public Notice # 26) that looks into the matter. "This inquiry," the agency says," takes into account the value that the United States puts on free, over-the-air television, while also exploring market-based mechanisms for television broadcasters to contribute to the broadband effort any spectrum in excess of that which they need to meet their public interest obligations and remain financially viable."

Holman Jenkins argues that the issue is incredibly contentious and likely to engender a great deal of political wrangling. "The spectrum puzzle won't be solved by the clean and simple deal the agency envisioned," he says. That's true, but I think the FCC still deserve some credit for at least starting the discussion. As my PFF colleague Barbara Esbin and I noted in our recent paper, "An Offer They Can't Refuse: Spectrum Reallocation That Can Benefit Consumers, Broadcasters & the Mobile Broadband Sector," [PDF], it's hard to see what is wrong with letting broadcasters hear offers of cash for their spectrum! That being said, they should have their hands forced (to give up the spectrum, that is). I think Jenkins generally gets it right when he says:

Continue reading Jenkins on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation Battle . . .

posted by Adam Thierer @ 2:11 PM | Mass Media, Media Regulation, Spectrum

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Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Let's Make a Deal: Broadcasters, Mobile Broadband, and a Market in Spectrum

PFF hosted a very animated discussion yesterday on the proposal to have broadcasters return some of their spectrum for auction in order to clear more spectrum for wireless broadband services. The event featured Blair Levin, Executive Director of the FCC's Omnibus Broadband Initiative, who has been at the center of recent reports that the agency has been talking to broadcasters and the wireless industry about such a proposal.

The tension between stakeholders was palpable as illustrated by heated exchanges between the panelists. Specific topics ranged from the true economic and social value of the spectrum held by broadcasters, to what specific bands would be viable to use for broadband services, to if there really is an upcoming spectrum crisis that needs to be proactively addressed. Panelists even touched upon how regulation of the broadcast industry could hinder any proposed deal. Excellent coverage of the event which describes the highlights better than I can be found at TVNewsCheck.com, WSJ Online, Communications Daily (subscription) and TR Daily (subscription).

Audio of the event is available here and a recent paper on the issue authored by Adam Thierer and Barbara Esbin is available here. A transcript of the event will be available shortly and Adam, who moderated the event, will share his thoughts on the event upon its release.

posted by Amy Smorodin @ 2:44 PM | Broadband, Communications, Mass Media, Spectrum, Wireless

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Saturday, November 21, 2009

The Wireless Bandwidth Crunch: Where Will We Find More Spectrum?

posted by Adam Thierer @ 5:48 PM | Broadband, Spectrum

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Wednesday, November 18, 2009

event: Dec. 1st Debate about Future of Broadcast TV Spectrum

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:17 AM | Events, Mass Media, Spectrum

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Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Let's Make a Deal: Broadcasters, Mobile Broadband, and a Market in Spectrum

posted by Adam Thierer @ 4:24 PM | Media Regulation, Spectrum

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Monday, October 26, 2009

event reminder: "Coase's FCC at 50" (Thur. 9am at George Mason Law School)

posted by Adam Thierer @ 8:16 PM | Spectrum, The FCC

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Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Cash-For-TV-Spectrum Scheme vs. A Property Rights Solution

posted by Adam Thierer @ 8:19 PM | Spectrum

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Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Why Congestion Pricing for the iPhone & Broadband Makes Sense

posted by Adam Thierer @ 9:02 PM | Economics, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, Wireless

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Sunday, September 27, 2009

Is Apple's iPhone the End of Innovation? Hahn & Singer on Handset Exclusivity Fears

posted by Adam Thierer @ 2:29 PM | Innovation, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, September 24, 2009

Economic Value of Unlicensed Spectrum

posted by Adam Thierer @ 8:56 PM | Commons, Spectrum, Wireless

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Monday, August 3, 2009

Where is FCC Authority to Regulate in Apple-Google Spat? What are the Costs?

posted by Adam Thierer @ 1:30 PM | Communications, Spectrum

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Thursday, February 26, 2009

Obama Wants to Tax Your Cell Phone

posted by Adam Thierer @ 6:27 PM | Spectrum, Taxes, Wireless

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Sunday, November 23, 2008

Will Traditional OTA Broadcast Networks Go Cable-Exclusive?

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:41 AM | Cable, Mass Media, Spectrum

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Friday, October 24, 2008

Of Hobgoblins and Kings

posted by Barbara Esbin @ 11:14 AM | Broadband, Communications, Spectrum, The FCC

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Monday, September 29, 2008

Problems in Muni Wi-fi Paradise, Part 9 (amazing article about Philly failure)

posted by Adam Thierer @ 2:10 PM | Municipal Ownership, Spectrum

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Friday, September 26, 2008

More Must-Carry or Another Federal Bailout?

posted by W. Kenneth Ferree @ 12:02 PM | Cable, Spectrum

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Sunday, September 21, 2008

Problems in Muni Wi-fi Paradise, Part 8 (Boynton Beach, FL)

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:28 AM | Municipal Ownership, Spectrum

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Saturday, August 16, 2008

More on M2Z / AWS spectrum fight

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:02 AM | Spectrum

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Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Tim Wu's Addiction to Regulatory Interference

posted by Barbara Esbin @ 5:50 PM | Broadband, Net Neutrality, Spectrum

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Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Joint FCC Filing on Internet Filtering Plan for AWS-3 Spectrum

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:20 AM | Free Speech, Online Safety & Parental Controls, Spectrum

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Friday, June 6, 2008

What's Worse Than Rigged Auctions & Internet Censorship? How About Both in One Package!

posted by Adam Thierer @ 6:05 PM | Broadband, Free Speech, Online Safety & Parental Controls, Spectrum

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Friday, April 4, 2008

Spectrum Auction - The Aftermath

posted by Amy Smorodin @ 11:32 AM | Spectrum

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Tuesday, April 1, 2008

"Spectrum Talk" blog

posted by Adam Thierer @ 5:10 PM | Spectrum

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Thursday, January 10, 2008

All-in and Unlucky

posted by Grant Eskelsen @ 4:14 PM | Communications, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, September 27, 2007

Hazlett on the iPhone, walled gardens, and innovation

posted by Adam Thierer @ 8:11 PM | Commons, Innovation, Interoperability, Spectrum

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Wednesday, September 26, 2007

WSJ on why free Wi-Fi is failing

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:31 AM | Broadband, Municipal Ownership, Spectrum

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Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Wi-Fi Piggybacking / Squatting Reconsidered

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:11 PM | Broadband, Communications, Innovation, Spectrum

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Friday, July 20, 2007

podcast on Battle over 700Mhz Auction & Open Access Proposals

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:30 AM | Spectrum

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Wednesday, June 27, 2007

The 700 MHz Auction--Uh Oh.

posted by Solveig Singleton @ 12:00 PM | Commons, Communications, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, April 19, 2007

Market-based spectrum allocation, Reed Hundt, and the Frontline proposal

posted by Tom Lenard @ 2:39 PM | DACA, Spectrum

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Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Good Slogans, Bad Policies: Open Access Regulations

posted by Scott Wallsten @ 10:55 AM | Broadband, Communications, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, Wireless, Wireline

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Friday, April 6, 2007

Frontline, Reed Hundt and Net Neutrality

posted by Jeff Eisenach @ 10:37 AM | Communications, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, Wireless

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Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Brito Deconstructs Spectrum Commons Theory

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:50 AM | Commons, Spectrum, Wireless

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Sunday, February 11, 2007

Wireless Net Neutrality?

posted by Scott Wallsten @ 3:29 PM | Broadband, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, February 8, 2007

Cyren Call -- Do We Need Another Cell Phone Carrier?

posted by Jeff Eisenach @ 11:42 AM | Digital TV, Interoperability, Spectrum

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Wednesday, January 31, 2007

The new broadband statistics are out!

posted by Scott Wallsten @ 9:04 PM | Broadband, Communications, Internet, Spectrum, The FCC

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Slate's Jack Shafer on "The Case for Killing the FCC"

posted by Adam Thierer @ 11:34 AM | Spectrum, The FCC

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Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Appearance on C-SPAN's "The Communicators"

posted by Adam Thierer @ 10:11 AM | Communications, DACA, Free Speech, General, Mass Media, Spectrum, Universal Service

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Problems in (Muni Wi-Fi) Paradise

posted by Adam Thierer @ 9:22 AM | Broadband, Municipal Ownership, Spectrum

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Wednesday, August 9, 2006

WSJ on the Broadband Market

posted by Patrick Ross @ 2:17 PM | Broadband, Communications, Net Neutrality, Spectrum, Wireless

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Tuesday, April 25, 2006

The OECD Broadband Rankings

posted by Tom Lenard @ 2:34 PM | Broadband, Municipal Ownership, Net Neutrality, Spectrum

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Tuesday, March 14, 2006

'Propertization' of Spectrum on the Hill

posted by Patrick Ross @ 2:48 PM | DACA, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, December 22, 2005

GAO on Extending Spectrum Auctions

posted by Patrick Ross @ 9:20 AM | Spectrum

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Tuesday, August 23, 2005

Spectrum Driving Innovation in Business Models

posted by @ 1:25 PM | Economics, Innovation, Spectrum

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Friday, August 19, 2005

The FCC and Organization Development

posted by Kyle Dixon @ 10:17 AM | Broadband, Cable, Capitol Hill, Communications, Innovation, Internet, Mass Media, Spectrum, The FCC, VoIP, Wireless, Wireline

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Thursday, June 30, 2005

Signs of a Not So Cozy Duopoly

posted by Ray Gifford @ 10:54 AM | Broadband, Digital TV, Spectrum

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Monday, June 20, 2005

DTV and Universal Service

posted by Ray Gifford @ 8:37 PM | Capitol Hill, Digital TV, Spectrum, Universal Service

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Friday, June 10, 2005

Spectrum Reform: The UK Perspective in Guatemala

posted by Tom Lenard @ 7:44 PM | Communications, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, June 9, 2005

Spectrum Reform in Guatemala

posted by Tom Lenard @ 11:42 PM | Communications, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, June 2, 2005

The DTV Transition - The Costs of Waiting

posted by Tom Lenard @ 5:03 PM | Digital TV, Spectrum

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Monday, May 23, 2005

DTV and Wireless Broadband: Come Now, Folks . .

posted by Kyle Dixon @ 5:10 PM | Broadband, Capitol Hill, Communications, Digital TV, Spectrum, Wireless

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Thursday, May 12, 2005

DTV USF

posted by Ray Gifford @ 9:10 AM | Digital TV, Spectrum

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Sunday, May 8, 2005

The Art of the DTV Deal: Continued

posted by Ray Gifford @ 5:15 PM | Broadband, Capitol Hill, Digital TV, Spectrum, The FCC, Wireless

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Recent Posts
  GAO: Wireless Prices Plummeting; Public Knowledge: We Must Regulate!
Camel Puts Nose under Tent with FCC "Wireless Model" for Internet Regulation
Abolishing the FCC and Other Fun Thoughts
FCC Wireless Report Punts - Effective Competition Actually Prevails
What is All This Nonsense about Smartphone Early Termination Fees?
State of the Net: summary of remarks by FCC Commissioners Copps & Baker
Summary of Tech Policy Summit Panel 2 at CES: The Spectrum Grab & Innovation
Transcript of PFF Event on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation
Jenkins on Broadcast Spectrum Reallocation Battle
Let's Make a Deal: Broadcasters, Mobile Broadband, and a Market in Spectrum
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